Blinco Edward F 1890

Edward Francis Blinco  [4344]
1890-1927

Known as Ted.

Father Nm: Frank Blinco [3860] born 1866 Walsall D.Q.

Mother Nm: Sarah Jane Randall [3309]1872

Marriage Dt: 1915 to Louise Jane Radford Warwickshire Volume Number: 6d Page Number: 2269

K comments: Brother Ernest Herbert served with the Army Service Corps

Spouse Comments: Louise Jane Radford [8276] born 1893 died Sep q1961 Rugby

Children: Edna M 1920, Douglas Henry Edward 1923

(Research): GR[B] Walsall Dec 1890, Walsall, Staffordshire, Volume: 6b Page: 685

1891 Census Aldridge Staffs
  1. Frank Blinco 22
  2. Sarah J Blinco 18
  3. Edward F Blinco 4/12
1911 Census Rugby Warwickshire
  1. Blinco Cissie Margret Dau F 1910 Rugby 13 M
  2. Blinco Edward Frances Son Gas Works Worker M 1891 Walsall 20
  3. Blinco Frank Head Paviour,Road Labourer M 1870 41
  4. Blinco Sarah Jane Wife F 1872 39
  5. Blinco Violet Grace Dau F 1905 6
  6. Blinco William Son Carter-Waggoner M 1892 Walsall 19
1912

Labourer with London and North Western Railway Co.

ICON ONLINE WAR GALLERY Royal Artillery
Gallery Royal Field Artillery
WW1

Blinco Edward Francis, 1890, Walsall, Gunner, 38, 33, 840044, 4th South Midland Brigade. 241st Bde, 243rd Bde. and 186th Bde. Royal Field Artillery.

1912-1914
  • Edward volunteered 13th Jul 1912 home for a 4-year service engagement with the 4th South Midland Home Brigade Territorial. 5th Warwick ‘H’ Battery, his home address given as 25 Wood St Rugby, occupation Railway labourer.

    4th South Midland Brigade Rifle Drill C 1914 From Evelyn C. Wilcock photo's Picasweb
    4th South Midland Brigade Rifle Drill C 1914 From Evelyn C. Wilcock photo’s Picasweb
  • Based in UK 1912-1914 at Pembrey, Salisbury Plain and Lydd. 4th South Midland (H) Bde Royal Field Artillery was a Howitzer Brigade that was in existence as such until May 1916.1 Edward seems to have been with light Howitzer batteries throughout the war.
1915
  • 31st Mar. Landed Le Havre France with Warwickshire Heavy Artillery Brigade.1
  • 1st Dec. Appointed Brigade Shoemaker (this was likely related to horseshoeing).

    Farrier shoeing Horses in 1914 . The making of the horseshoes was Ted's occupation so less dangerous than the fitting of them.
    Farrier shoeing Horses in 1914. The making of the horseshoes was Ted’s occupation so less dangerous than the fitting of them.
  • 12-21st Dec. Home leave granted of approx ten days.
1916
  • 18th May. Posted to 241st Bde attached to D (Worcester) Battery. This is the time of brigade name changes, the 4th South Midland was renamed the 243rd Bde. However, at the same time, the 4th South Midland was split up and Edward and other men went to the 241st Bde.
  • 1st July – 18th Nov. The Somme. All four South Midlands Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery fought in the Battle of the Somme attached to the 48th Div. of the IV Army. The role of the 241st Bde RFA seems to have been that they were heavily involved in the bombardment leading up to the Battle of the Somme with the Brigade near Beaumont Hamel. The 48th Division fought in the following battles of the Somme;
    • The Battle of Albert – The Division held the line between the 56th (London) and the 31st Divisions, both of which were heavily engaged at Gommecourt and Serre respectively on 1st July 1916. Two of the Warwickshire battalions of the Division attacked that day and suffered heavy casualties in assaulting the Quadrilateral (Heidenkopf)).1
    • The Battle of Bazentin Ridge in which the Division captured Ovillers
    • The Battle of Pozieres Ridge
    • The Battle of the Ancre Heights
    • Oct. It seems that Ted was not employed as a Shoemaker all the time his records show he was in October 1916 used in that capacity implying he wasn’t at other times.
    • 13th– 19th Nov. The Battle of the Ancre
  • 15th Dec. Admitted to Hospital (JCT or ICT Left Hand). If it is ICT rather than JCT then I would interpret it as “Inflammation of Connective Tissue” sometimes seen as “Injury to the Connective Tissue”. Basically, any non-penetrative wound or injury to the muscles and/or ligaments.
  • 27th Dec. Transported home to England on hospital Ship Wimmera.

    Ted invalided back to Britain on this New Zealand hospital ship which was sunk in 1918. Sinking-departed Auckland for Sydney with seventy-six passengers, hit a mine laid by the German raider Wolf, off Cape Farewell, New Zealand, 26 June 1918.
    Ted invalided back to Britain on this New Zealand hospital ship which was sunk in 1918. Sinking-departed Auckland for Sydney with seventy-six passengers hit a mine laid by the German raider Wolf, off Cape Farewell, New Zealand, 26 June 1918.
1917
  • 10th Feb. Transferred to 3/48th South Midland Bde RFA. Ted appears to have then spent most of 1917 at a home base in England.
  • 19th Sept. Ted is after 9 months posted back to France.
  • 13th Oct. Posted to ‘D’ battery 186th Bde RFA this was a 4.5-inch Howitzer Battery this Brigade was attached to the 39th Division. The 39th Division was at Passchendaele in Oct.
1918
  • 22th Jan. Admitted 17th Casualty Clearing Station probably in Hazebrouck suffering from diarrhoea.
  • 19th Feb. Edward is made the Brigade Tailor, as he had no training in tailoring one wonders exactly what his work entailed.
  • 20th Oct. UK leave for 10 days
  • 21st Dec. Attached to base workshop attached to a field unit.
1919
  • 16th Jan. Attached to Wagon Workshop Royal Engineers Audruicq (nr Calais France)
  • 16th Apr. Discharged
Sources
  1. The Long, Long Trail The British Army in the Great War, 1914-1918.
  2. Slaughter on the Somme by John Grehan, Martin Mace
Medals

triple royal sussex regtAwarded the 1914-15 Star, British and Victory medals.

After the War
Death 1927

Rugby, Northamptonshire, Volume: 6d, Page: 1035

Ted died very shortly after the war in 1927 at age 36 leaving a widow and two young children.

GALLERY

There are records in the National Archives for this man. For copyright reasons, they cannot be re-published.