Blincoe Sidney 1889

Sidney Blincoe [4298]
Sidney close up poppy
Died from war-related illness 1920
1889-1920

Father Nm: Jonah Blincoe [397] 1848-1932 : Oldest known Ancestor – William Blincow d.1702 Bicester.

Mother Nm: Mary Ann Hitchman 1849-1901.

Marriage Dt:1918, 4th March 1918 to Mary Jane Broomfield at St Thomas Chapel, Ringwood, Hants, Ringwood 2b 1598.

K comments: Brother William John served with the Royal Warwickshire Regt. and died in 1919.

Spouse Comments: Mary Jane Broomfield 1896.

Children:

Birth 1889 Long Crendon Bucks.

Thame 3a 773

1891 Census Air Hill, Long Crendon
  1. Jonah Blincoe 41 Long Crendon Head Carter On Farm
  2. Mary A Blincoe 41 Moreton In Marsh, Gloucester, Wife
  3. Louisa Blincoe 7 Long Crendon Daughter
  4. Sidney Blincoe 1 Long Crendon Daughter
  5. William Blincoe 14 Long Crendon Son
  6. Florence Blincoe 4 Long Crendon Daughter
  7. John Blincoe 78 Stoke Lyne Lodger Farm Labourer
1901 Census Church End, Long Crendon.
  1. Jonah Blincoe 51 Long Crendon Head Carter On Farm
  2. Mary A Blincoe 51 Moreton In Marsh, Gloucester, Wife
  3. Louisa Blincoe 7 Long Crendon Daughter
  4. Sidney Blincoe 11 Long Crendon Son
  5. Fanny Blincoe 8 Long Crendon Daughter
  6. Lily Blincoe 6 Long Crendon Daughter
1911 Census Hambledon
  1. Blinco Sidney Age 21 A Labourer At Borough Farm, Hambledon, A Lodger Of Frank Blake (Sheperd)
ICON ONLINE WAR GALLERY asc badge large
Online War Photo Album

Army Service Corps

WW1

Blincoe Sidney, 1889, Long Crendon, Bucks, Acting Sergeant, T4/038008, Driver, 199th Coy. Army Service Corps. Horse Transport

1914
  • 22nd Dec. Enlisted at Woolwich, 25 years old a Carman. Sidney was at the Home base from 22nd Dec 1914 – 23rd Sept 1915

  • Initially a Driver in the Army Service Corps, Horse Transport company.

    Horse transport of the Army Service Corps loading up at a Brigade dump for provisions. Albert, March 1917.
    Horse transport of the Army Service Corps loading up at a Brigade dump for provisions. Albert, March 1917.
1915
  • 23rd Sept. Sidney embarked for France (until 23rd Feb 1918)

Sidney was in 199th Company ASC which was part of the 25th Divisional Train. The 25th Division was established in September 1914 as part of Army Order 388 authorising Kitchener’s Third New Army, K3. The units of the Division began to assemble in the area of Salisbury. Early days were somewhat chaotic, the new volunteers having very few trained officers and NCOs to command them, no organised billets or equipment. Inspected by Lord Kitchener on 12 August 1915, the units of the Division crossed to France 25 – 30 September and concentrated in the area of Nieppe. The 25th Division thereafter served on the Western Front throughout the war, involved in many battles. Sidney, of course, was likely in his role (as a driver) to be close to combat very often and it was in one of these situations he was gassed badly enough for it to eventually end his life early in 1920.3

1916
  • The German attack on Vimy Ridge in May

  • 1st – 13th Jul. The Battle of Albert* The first two weeks of Anglo-French offensive operations in the Battle of the Somme. The 25th Division was in support but some units took over fronts lines in relief on 3rd July etc.

  • 14th Jul. The Battle of Bazentin* Launched by the British Fourth Army at dawn on 14th marked the start of the second phase of the Battle of the Somme.

  • 23rdJul. – 7th Aug. The Battle of Pozieres*.

  • 1stOct- 11th Nov. The Battle of the Ancre Heights* (a phase of the Battles of the Somme 1916)

The battles marked * are phases of the Battles of the Somme 1916

1917
  • 20th May. Promoted to Acting Sergeant.

  • 7th-14th Jun. The Battle of Messines Ridge. The 25th Div. was selected to be one that would make the assault and was placed in the front line between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads.

    • The Division lost no fewer than 24 infantry company commanders during this action. In total, the losses in this successful action were 145 officers and 2907 men killed, wounded or missing.

  • Jul. The Battle of Pilckem (a phase of the Third Battles of Ypres)

1918
  • 24th Feb – 10th Mar. On furlough to get married to Mary Jane Bloomfield in Ringwood, Hants. Returned to France and stayed there until 25th Jun.1919

  • 21st – 23rd Mar. The Battle of St Quentin. In this battle, the units of the Division were ordered to reinforce other sorely pressed formations in a piecemeal fashion. From the opening phases of the attack until the Division was withdrawn six days later, it fought continuously under strange commanders and staffs, and not as a Division.1

  • 24th – 28th Mar. The First Battle of Bapaume. The defensive fight was continuous and confusing, as enemy units pushed forward on all sides. Carrying out a fighting withdrawal, by 26 March the Division found itself on the 1916 Somme battlefield. On that date, the Division was finally relieved and moved to Pommier and thence to Couin. By 28 March, the Brigades were south of Doullens and out – for the moment – of harm’s way. The Division was desperately tired, having been in continuous action and covering on 27 and 28 March a considerable distance on foot (36 miles in 36 hours). It had also lost more than half its fighting strength: 318 officers and men dead, 1496 wounded and 1588 missing, many taken prisoner.1

  • The Battle of Messines, 1918. The enemy attack broke through the British Ploegsteert and advanced along the Ypres road, endangering the garrison holding Ploegsteert Wood. Ordered to counter-attack, 75th Brigade, the Royal Engineers, Machine Gun Battalion and other elements of the Division became involved in heavy fighting. 1

  • 13th – 16th Apr. The Battle of Bailleul.

  • 25th – 26th Apr. The Second Battle of Kemmel.

  • 26th May – 14th Jun. The Battle of the Aisne 1918.Casualties 4338 officers and men, of whom 2511 were missing.

  • 3rd – 7th Oct. The Battle of Beaurevoir (a phase of the Battles of the Hindenburg Line)

  • 8th Oct. The Battle of Cambrai (a phase of the Battles of the Hindenburg Line). Proved to be a highly successful day for the Division, which made a fine advance in the area of Ponchaux with few casualties. 1

  • Oct. The Pursuit to and Battle of the Selle (phases of the Final Advance in Picardy)

  • Nov. The Battle of the Sambre (phases of the Final Advance in Picardy)

1919
  • Promoted to Sergeant in 1919

  • 26th Jun. Returned home until discharged on 24th Jul. 1919

Sources
  1. The Long, Long Trail, The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians http://www.1914-1918.net/.

  2. The 25th Division in France and Flanders; Kincaid-Smith, M.

  3. Family recollections of Mabel White grand niece.

Further Reading on 25th Division @ http://www.1914-1918.net/25div.htm

Medalstriple royal sussex regt

1914-15 Star, British and Victory medals.

After the War

Death 1920 Age 31 years

Death 22 May 1920 of heart failure, Widow Mary awarded a pension by the Army and Sidney added to the memorial at the CWCG. Indicating health affected by war experiences.

Buried at Ringwood Cemetery (Ringwood being his home in 1920) and there is also a war memorial in Ringwood to Sidney.

Ringwood War-Memorial
Ringwood WW1 Memorial which remembers Sidney Blincoe he is also buried here.
From Steve Blincoe
Reading your work on the descendants of John Blincow 1788 – 1850 I
happened across the name of Sidney Blincoe.
I was reminded of an incident when my children were younger. Two of my
sons were in the Boy Scouts and were taking part in the Remembrance
Sunday Parade. I was waiting, with my Wife and Mother for the Parade
to arrive at the war memorial in Ringwood Hants UK where I had moved
about 7 years before. My eye was idly scanning the names on the
Memorial and I discovered that one of those named was an S Blincoe.
This was a bit of a shock as I am Steve Blincoe!
A bit of research with the local history buffs led to his grave in the
Ringwood cemetery and the information that he was a soldier who came to
Ringwood to recover from his wounds (there were a lot of Hospitals in
the area at that time).
He has a listing in the CWGC pages here:
http://www.cwgc.org/search/casualty_details.aspx?casualty=362691
and the details of his marriage tie-up with those in your researches.
I would stress that he is not a direct ancestor of mine as we only
moved to Ringwood in 1988.

Widow Mary Jane Blincoe would have received the memorial plaque and scroll from the King . In addition, a War Widows pension of 1 Pound per week but this would have terminated 2 years after she re-married.

Plaque and scroll
Memorial Plaque and Scroll from the King and would have been inscribed with wife’s name as next of kin
Gallery

 

There are 8 records in the National Archives for this man. For copyright reasons, they cannot be re-published.

Battle of Messines map
7th Jun. 1917
Battle of Messines; Detonation of 19 mines beneath German positions enabled Allied infantry to capture the salient.
7th-14th Jun. The Battle of Messines. The 25th Division was selected to be one that would make the assault and was placed in the front line between the Wulverghem-Messines and Wulverghem-Wytschaete roads
The map shows lines of progression until 31st July 1917
Mp source WO297/693
25Div_26Mar18 The First Battle of Bapaume
Sidney in many Battles in 1918
24th – 28th Mar. The First Battle of Bapaume
a phase of the First Battles of the Somme 1918
The defensive fight was continuous and confusing, as enemy units pushed forward on all sides. Carrying out a fighting withdrawal, by 26 March the Division found itself on the 1916 Somme battlefield. On that date, the Division was finally relieved and moved to Pommier and thence to Couin. Bty 28 March, the Brigades were south of Doullens and out – for the moment – of harm’s way. The Division was desperately tired, having been in continuous action and covering on 27 and 28 March a considerable distance on foot (36 miles in 36 hours). It had also lost more than half its fighting strength: 318 officers and men dead, 1496 wounded and 1588 missing, many taken prisoner.
Source
1.The Long, Long Trail, The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians  http://www.1914-1918.net/
Sidney was a driver in the Horse Transport Companies in WWI . This photograph showing a typical service wagon train.
ASC Horse Train early WW1
2952897688_5c646f8792_z
Drivers of ASC in Southern England 1915
ASC driver and Peerless Lorry
An ASC lorry driver and his vehicle. The lorry/truck is a Peerless.
asc driver and soldiers in winter time
A group of WW1 ASC Drivers – While  Sidney initially joined the Horse Transport of the ASC this was phased out as trucks became more available and so Drivers migrated to the new role.
7985260017_c71accb972_c
ASC Truck driver and vehicle WW1
ASC transporting men WW1
ASC transport line WW1
Sidney and Mary Blincoe
Sidney and Mary Jane Bloomfield taken at their wedding on 4 Mar 1918.
3257001
Marriage 4th March 1918  to Mary Jane Broomfield  at St Thomas Chapel (Meeting House), Ringwood Hants
Sidney was on a leave furlough and went back to the front.
Note
Ringwood Meeting House was built by a local group of Presbyterians. They were known as non-conformists or dissenters as they wished to worship God in their own way, without the dogma of bishops or creeds found in the Church of England. The term ‘Meeting House’ was used by all 18th-century dissenters, not just Quakers. Unlike the Quakers, Presbyterians held structured services or ‘meetings’, and employed a minister who preached long sermons from a pulpit. Over a quarter of Ringwood’s population of 2000 in the early 18th century were Presbyterians.
The building became known as the Upper Meeting House after a group of Independents broke away and built their own Lower Meeting House on the site of the present Trinity United Church in Christchurch Road.
During the 19th century, the congregation of Ringwood Meeting House became Unitarian when the building was called St Thomas’s Chapel until it reverted to its original name in the 1930s. In 1976 the Unitarians were unable to maintain the Meeting House and it ceased to be a religious building.
Memorial to 25th Division in Bailleul,
Memorial to Sidney’s 25th Division in Bailleul, with thanks to Richard Howells. The memorial stands on a traffic roundabout not far from the main town square in Bailleul, where the Division fought in the Battle of the Lys in April 1918.
Source
1.The Long, Long Trail, The British Army of 1914-1918 – for family historians  http://www.1914-1918.net/